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Simple Torches (Click thumbnails for larger images)

Materials & Tools:

Kebab Skewers

Cotton Thread

PVA

Craft Knife

Scissors

Stage 1

Cut a length of cotton from the reel. I found 20cm / 8" was about right for the skewers and thread I used. Loosely tie an overhand knot, and slip the loop onto the skewer around 19mm / 3/4" from the point. Secure the thread with a small dot of PVA if you wish.

Stage 2

Wrap the rest of the thread around the skewer, and secure the loose end with a little more PVA. Try to cover the short tail of thread whilst you wrap - you can always cut it off later if you don't manage to hide it. Leave to dry.

Stage 3

With a sharp craft knife, trim the skewer about 1mm from the top of the wrapping. Rotate the skewer as you cut - do NOT try to cut right through in one go.

 

Here is a completed torch - simple but effective.

 

...and a dozen torches in a crate ready for use.

Fancy Torches (Click thumbnails for larger images)

Materials & Tools:

Pendant Clasps aka 'bails' or 'bead caps'

Kebab Skewers

Plastic Tube

Superglue

Craft Knife

Pliers

Paint & Brushes

Stage 1

With a sharp craft knife, trim the skewer about 19mm / 3/4" from the sharp end. Rotate the skewer as you cut - do NOT try to cut right through in one go.

Stage 2

Now cut a 3mm / 1/8" cylinder from the plastic tube, and slide it onto the skewer. Slide it to the thick end, with only about half of it overlapping the skewer, leaving a small hollow. Don't glue it in place just yet.

Stage 3

With the pliers, crimp the attachment loop on the base of the clasp so that it will fit inside the plastic tube.

Stage 4

Put a small blob of superglue into the hollow end of the tube, and place the crimped part of the clasp into the glue.

Tweezers are a good idea at this stage and a blob of blu-tack or clothes peg to hold the skewer.

Stage 5

When dry, spray the piece with black primer.

Stage 6

For a simple effect, dry-brush with a metallic colour - these two were done in pewter.

 

Stage 7

To add flames to the model, see here:

 

Flames

Stage 8

For a fancy sconce to hold the torch on a wall, see here:

 

Sconces

Sconces (Click thumbnails for larger images)

Materials & Tools:

Pendant Clasps aka 'bails' or 'bead caps'

Pliers

Tweezers

Paint & Brushes

PVA

Stage 1

Hold the chain loop of the clasp firmly with the pliers. Using the tweezers, bend one of the 'leaves' of the clasp outwards.

Stage 2

Continue around the clasp, bending all of the 'leaves'.

Stage 3

To flatten the leaves further, place the clasp on a firm work-surface. Now press down firmly on opposite sides with the pliers, as shown.

Stage 4

Rotate the clasp, and continue to press opposite sides until the new base looks nice and flat.

Stage 5

Undercoat the piece with black primer.

Stage 6

Dry-brush with a metallic colour - in this case, a pewter.

 

Stage 7

Apply a blob of PVA to the parts of the clasp that will be touching the surface, and fix them to the wall.

Stage 8

Add the torches of your choice. You can glue the torches in position, or leave them removable for greater variety.

 

Simple Torches
Fancy Torches

Flames (Click thumbnails for larger images)

Materials & Tools:

Cotton Bud

PVA

Paints & Brushes

 

Stage 1

Pull the ball of cotton wool from the plastic shaft of the cotton bud. A cotton bud is a good size and has a nice rounded end, so it is much simpler than starting with a cotton ball.

Stage 2

Twist the ragged tail of the cotton to form a point. Remove any trailing wisps if necessary.

Stage 3

Insert a pin into the thick end of the cotton to act as a handle, and paint the bottom section red.

Stage 4

Add some yellow paint above the red, leaving a few streaks going into the white.

Stage 5 

Whilst the yellow paint is still wet, blend orange between the red and yellow bands.

Stage 6

Once dry, remove the pin and put a good blob of PVA on the base of the cotton. Carefully press the piece into the clasp of the torch.

Stage 7

An alternative flame done with shades of green. This could represent the presence of gas, or the magical flame of an evil wizard.

Stage 8

Another alternative painted in shades of blue, which looks good as a clean magical flame.

Galvanised Steel (Click thumbnails for larger images)

Stage 1

Cut a piece of nylon pan scourer to about 1/2" x 2" to use for stippling the paint. This gives a rougher texture than using a bristle brush.

Stage 2

Prime in black.

Stage 3

Undercoat in a dark metallic colour. This is Princely Pewter from Accents, but a dark gunmetal should work just as well.

Stage 4

Stipple a metallic silver over this - it doesn't matter if the first coat is dry. Try to cover 1/3 to 1/2 of the area.

Stage 5

Mix a 50% metallic pewter to 50% metallic silver colour, and stipple this on next. Try to cover 1/3 of the area, leaving 1/3 silver and 1/3 pewter.

Stage 6

If necessary, stipple on more of the original pewter colour to even out the texture. Apply a coat of gloss varnish if you wish.

Abamantium (Click thumbnails for larger images)

Stage 1

Cut a piece of nylon pan scourer to about 1/2" x 2" to use for stippling the paint. This gives a rougher texture than using a bristle brush.

Stage 2

Prime in black.

Stage 3

Undercoat in a dark metallic bronze colour. Add a little burnt umber to metallic gold if you want to mix your own.

Stage 4

Stipple a metallic gold over this - it doesn't matter if the first coat is dry. Try to cover 1/3 to 1/2 of the area.

Stage 5

Mix a 50% metallic gold to 50% metallic copper colour, and stipple this on next. Try to cover 1/3 of the area, leaving 1/3 silver and 1/3 pewter.

Stage 6

If necessary, stipple on more of the original bronze colour to even out the texture. Apply a coat of gloss varnish if you wish.

 

 


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These articles are provided under this Creative Commons Licence:

 

Dealing With Air-Bubbles II (Images to follow)

 

With the exception of #6, the techniques described above make a feature of any casting flaws, but there are also many ways to simply conceal them. Of course, you can simply add furniture or an architectural feature like a buttress to cover the holes, but these options are not always possible whilst keeping the feel or purpose of the model. With that in mind, here are some ideas that need not take up much space.

 

Floors - Fantasy:

Rug, Animal Skin, Discarded / Fallen Object

Leaves, Grass, Moss, Fungi, Nest, Slime, Fire, Broken Masonry, Patch of Dirt or Sand,

 

Interior Walls - Fantasy:

Tapestry, Picture, Mirror, Torch or Candle, Narrow Shelf,

 

 

Exterior Walls - Fantasy:

Sign, Plaque, Shield, Pipe, Grotesque,

Moss, Creeper, Fungi,

 

Floors - Modern / Sci-Fi:

Hatch / Grate,

 

Interior Walls - Modern / Sci-Fi:

Clock, TV / View-screen, Switch, Socket, Pipes

 

Exterior Walls - Modern / Sci-Fi:

Guttering or Downspout, Grating,